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Life after stroke: What to expect

Navigating Vision and Sensory Changes After a Stroke: Understanding the Impact

Woman in hospital room

A stroke can have a profound impact on various bodily functions, including vision and sensory perception. The brain regions responsible for processing and interpreting visual and sensory information may be affected, leading to changes in how a person sees, feels, and interacts with their environment.

Navigating Vision and Sensory Changes After a Stroke: Understanding the Impact

A stroke can have a profound impact on various bodily functions, including vision and sensory perception. The brain regions responsible for processing and interpreting visual and sensory information may be affected, leading to changes in how a person sees, feels, and interacts with their environment. Understanding the potential issues with vision and senses after a stroke is essential for stroke survivors, their loved ones, and healthcare professionals involved in their care.


Here are some key aspects to consider:

  1. Visual Impairment: Visual impairments are common after a stroke and can manifest in different ways. Some individuals may experience partial or complete loss of vision in one or both eyes, known as hemianopia or homonymous hemianopsia. This condition affects the ability to see objects or people on one side of the visual field. Other visual disturbances may include blurred vision, double vision (diplopia), or difficulties with depth perception. Vision problems after a stroke may impact daily activities such as reading, driving, and recognizing faces.

  2. Sensory Changes: Sensory changes can occur after a stroke, affecting various senses such as touch, temperature perception, proprioception (awareness of body position), and spatial awareness. Some individuals may experience altered sensation, such as numbness, tingling, or hypersensitivity, in specific body parts. These changes can impact fine motor skills, balance, and coordination. Sensory impairments may also affect the ability to perceive pain, leading to increased risk of injuries.

  3. Neglect and Unilateral Spatial Awareness: Unilateral spatial neglect is a condition where individuals are unaware of or neglect one side of their body or environment, typically on the opposite side of the brain lesion caused by the stroke. This neglect can affect perception, attention, and the ability to navigate and interact with the neglected side. It is important to address neglect through rehabilitation strategies, environmental modifications, and compensatory techniques to improve functional independence and safety.

  4. Rehabilitation and Adaptation: Rehabilitation plays a crucial role in addressing vision and sensory changes after a stroke. A multidisciplinary team, including occupational therapists, physical therapists, and vision specialists, can provide comprehensive assessments and develop tailored treatment plans. Rehabilitation may include:

    • Vision therapy: Specialized exercises and techniques to improve visual field awareness, scanning abilities, and visual processing.

    • Sensory retraining: Techniques to improve sensory perception and integration, such as desensitization exercises or sensory stimulation.

    • Environmental modifications: Adjustments to the living or working environment to optimize safety and independence, such as improving lighting, reducing clutter, or using contrasting colors for better visual perception.

    • Assistive devices: The use of assistive devices such as magnifying glasses, specialized glasses, visual aids, or adaptive equipment to enhance visual and sensory function.

    • Compensation strategies: Developing compensatory techniques and strategies to adapt to vision and sensory changes, such as using alternative sensory cues or relying on intact senses for additional information.

  5. Emotional and Psychological Impact: Vision and sensory changes after a stroke can have a significant emotional and psychological impact on individuals. It is common to experience feelings of frustration, sadness, anxiety, or loss due to the challenges and adjustments required. Psychological support, counseling, and participation in support groups can help address these emotional aspects and provide coping strategies.


Understanding and addressing the challenges associated with vision and sensory changes after a stroke is crucial for optimizing rehabilitation outcomes and improving the individual's quality of life. Collaborative care involving healthcare professionals, family members, and caregivers can provide the necessary support, resources, and interventions to help stroke survivors adapt to these changes, regain independence, and navigate their daily lives more effectively.

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