top of page

Life after stroke: What to expect

Addressing Incontinence Issues After a Stroke: Restoring Confidence and Quality of Life

Woman in hospital room

Incontinence, the loss of bladder or bowel control, is a common issue that stroke survivors may face. The damage to the brain caused by a stroke can disrupt the normal functioning of the urinary and bowel systems, leading to difficulties in controlling urine or stool release.

Addressing Incontinence Issues After a Stroke: Restoring Confidence and Quality of Life

Incontinence, the loss of bladder or bowel control, is a common issue that stroke survivors may face. The damage to the brain caused by a stroke can disrupt the normal functioning of the urinary and bowel systems, leading to difficulties in controlling urine or stool release. Dealing with incontinence can be challenging, but with appropriate management strategies and support, stroke survivors can regain control, restore confidence, and improve their overall quality of life.


Here are some key points to consider:

  1. Types of Incontinence: There are different types of incontinence that stroke survivors may experience:

    • Urge incontinence: This involves a sudden and strong urge to urinate, which is difficult to control, resulting in involuntary leakage.

    • Stress incontinence: It occurs when physical activities such as coughing, sneezing, or lifting put pressure on the bladder, causing urine leakage.

    • Overflow incontinence: In this type, the bladder doesn't empty completely, leading to frequent dribbling or a constant, slow leakage of urine.

    • Bowel incontinence: It involves the inability to control bowel movements, resulting in accidental fecal leakage or the inability to reach the toilet in time.

  2. Management Strategies: Managing incontinence after a stroke involves a combination of strategies tailored to the individual's specific needs. Here are some common approaches:

    • Pelvic floor exercises: Strengthening the pelvic floor muscles through exercises, such as Kegels, can improve bladder and bowel control.

    • Bladder training: Developing a schedule for regular voiding and gradually increasing the time between trips to the bathroom can help regain bladder control.

    • Bowel management: Establishing a regular routine for bowel movements, maintaining a high-fiber diet, staying hydrated, and using stool softeners or laxatives when necessary can help manage bowel incontinence.

    • Medications: In some cases, healthcare providers may prescribe medications to help control overactive bladder or manage bowel function.

    • Absorbent products: The use of absorbent pads, adult diapers, or other incontinence products can provide a sense of security and help manage accidents effectively.

    • Assistive devices: The use of tools such as bedpans, commodes, or toilet risers can assist individuals with limited mobility or coordination in reaching the bathroom in time.

    • Fluid management: Monitoring and regulating fluid intake, especially before bedtime, can help reduce nighttime incontinence episodes.

    • Environmental modifications: Making adjustments to the home environment, such as installing handrails or grab bars, can enhance safety and accessibility.

  3. Seeking Professional Help: It's crucial for stroke survivors experiencing incontinence to seek professional help from healthcare providers, such as urologists, continence nurses, or pelvic floor therapists. These professionals can assess the specific issues, provide guidance on management strategies, and offer treatments tailored to individual needs.

  4. Emotional Support: Incontinence can have a significant impact on a person's emotional well-being and self-esteem. Stroke survivors may experience feelings of embarrassment, frustration, or isolation. It's important to address the emotional aspect of incontinence and seek support from healthcare providers, support groups, or counselors who can provide guidance, coping strategies, and reassurance.

  5. Rehabilitation and Continence Programs: Participating in rehabilitation programs, including pelvic floor rehabilitation, can be beneficial for stroke survivors with incontinence. These programs often involve exercises, education on bladder and bowel health, and guidance on lifestyle modifications.

It's important to remember that incontinence after a stroke is a common issue and can be managed with the right strategies and support. With patience, perseverance, and professional assistance, stroke survivors can regain control, minimize accidents, and regain confidence

bottom of page